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The Black Action Defense Committee

BADC PRESS RELEASE
April 17, 2021


BADC TO LAUNCH CHARTER CHALLENGE OF THE PROVINCIAL EMERGENCY ORDER OF APRIL 16, 2021

FLASHING POLICE LIGHTS

The Black Action Defense Committee has Instructed Legal Counsel to Launch a Charter Challenge to the Provincial order, which came into force at 12.01 am to Granting War Measures –like Powers to police and other law enforcement agencies throughout Ontario.

The Government’s press release announcing the new order states as follows:

“It is essential that measures are in place to allow provincial offences officers to lawfully require an individual to disclose their correct name, date of birth and address in order to protect our communities," said Sylvia Jones, Solicitor General. "By providing provincial offences officers with this temporary power to obtain identifying information under the EMCPA, they will be able to enforce emergency orders during these extraordinary times.

It is a well-documented and irrefutable fact that Black Citizens are significantly over policed and given more serious charges than white citizens.  

 Therefore granting powers to stop and question citizen and force citizens to Provide personal identification to the police and to tell the police where they live, where they are going and for what purpose is not only a fundamental breach of people rights, but the information that they provide could be used for other nefarious purposes to the detriment of the individual as was exposed by the Macdonald Commission into police wrong doings.  

BADC Fundamentally supports all lawful and reasonable measures of Public Health and Governments to contain the COVID 19 Pandemic however these measures are neither based on the available scientific knowledge nor advice from the experts, nor reasonable.

BADC has played and continues to play an instrumental role in the development and implementation of public policy in the general area of policing, race relations and police accountability." 

  • The Report of the Independent Street Checks Review, The Honourable Justice Michael H. Tulloch, December 31, 2018
  • Report On The Police Complaints System In Ontario prepared for the Attorney General of Ontario by The Honourable Patrick Lesage, Q.C., April 25, 2005
  • Review Report on the Special Investigations Unit Reforms prepared for the Attorney General of Ontario by The Honourable George W. Adams, Q.C., 2003
  • Report of the Commission on Systemic Racism in the Ontario Justice System, David Cole  and Margaret Gittens, 1995
  • Racism Behind Bars: The Treatment of Black and other Racial Minority Prisoners in Ontario Prisons, David Cole and Margaret Gittens, 1994.
  • Stephen Lewis’ Report on Race Relations in Ontario, 1992
  • The Report of the Race Relations and Policing Task Force, 1992, Clare Lewis
  • Towards a New Beginning: The Report and Action Plan of the Four-Level Government/African Canadian Working Group, 1992, John G. Dennison, ET. al
  • Review of Race Relations Practices of the Metropolitan Police Force, 1992, Allan G. Andrews, Metropolitan Auditor, the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto
  • Ontario Human Rights Commission Report A Collective Impact
  • Ontario Human Rights Commission Report A Desperate Impact
Based on these and other reports and BADC’s continued consultation on policing reform legislation and regulations we have very high confidence and certainty that this order will lead to tragedy in Ontario if not over turned.     

See the full Article:
BADC TO LAUNCH CHARTER CHALLENGE OF THE PROVINCIAL EMERGENCY ORDER OF APRIL 16, 2021


CONTACT: Kingsley P. Gilliam Director of Communications 647-267-1774

BADC NEWS
33 Years and Counting

Inquest jury makes anti-racism suggestions in police killing of black man

BY COLIN PERKEL, THE CANADIAN PRESSPOSTED JUN 30, 2017 1:50 PM EST LAST UPDATED JUN 30, 2017 AT 4:40 PM EST TORONTO  

The police killing of a black father of five who was holding a hammer in an apartment building two years ago was a homicide, an inquest jury ruled Friday in a case infused with allegations of racism.  The coroner’s inquest verdict carries no criminal or civil liability, but the jury also made 39 recommendations, including several aimed at officer training, especially with regard to both overt and subconscious racist attitudes. 

 They also recommended police hone their skills in dealing with people like Andrew Loku, who had mental-health issues when he was shot. Jonathan Shime, who represented the Loku family, said outside coroner’s court that he was pleased with the jury’s approach. “The reality is a disproportionate number of black men are dying at the hands of the police,” Shime said. “It’s time for that to stop.” The July 2015 shooting of Loku, 45, which sparked days of protests by the group Black Lives Matter, was an unnecessary tragedy, Shime said. Police, he said, had no reason to resort to deadly force. The inquest under Dr. John Carlisle heard how six people had interacted with Loku, whom neighbours described as a sweet man, in the run-up to the shooting.

They said they had been able to calm him down and he was on the verge of giving up the hammer he was holding when police — responding to a 911 call about a drunk, angry man — raced into his apartment building and confronted him.

Within about 20 seconds of their arrival, Const. Andrew Doyle fired twice, hitting Loku on the left side of the chest. Doyle testified he fired because he feared for his life when Loku, hammer raised, started walking towards him and his partner in a hallway.

Past Cases

Black Action Defence Committee v. Huxter, Coroner
Black Action Defence Committee and Huxter, Coroner Re Urban Alliance on Race Relations for Metropolitan Toronto (Justice) and Huxter

What's Happening

Black Action Defense Committee And Jamaican Canadian Association Pleased With Proposed Changes To Police Oversight In Ontario... See full article